The Real Trap Queenz of the OC WEBSeries | SEASON 1


(Rod Brown) #21

Okay. Thank you so much @samlockie. We are just 3 brothers, just trying to be great, using what we have to make it work for us & for our peers who like comedy & understands us as individuals. We are 1 year old into this and we are just getting started. Anything that you have stated has been noted, and I thank you :blush:


(Rod Brown) #22

@Bri_Castellini we are just starting off. We don’t have a big team, just us 3


(Bri Castellini) #23

You should definitely check out that series of posts, then, because it’s written specifically for people who are new and just starting out :slight_smile: and let me know if there’s something else I should write about that would be helpful to you and your show!
http://community.stareable.com/c/guide-to-creating-a-series


(Rod Brown) #24

I do apologize that the webseries comes off as sexist, but as a brand, we do not promote sexism. The idea we was going for was from a show we watched growing called (In Living Color) and there was a segment called Men On Film. We discussed about the segment and expressed how hilarious it was as kids. So we wanted to do a remake, put our spin to it by improv, make it into a webseries and come up with our own concept of a storyline


(Pablo Andreu) #25

Putting your stuff up for critique and listening to feedback is a big step. Keep it up!


(Rod Brown) #26

Of course. It’s just critiques :blush:


(Rod Brown) #27

Definitely will check it out! Thanks @Bri_Castellini


(Bri Castellini) #28

That’s good to hear! But I think it’s valuable to know that that’s the way it might come across to other people. And like I said originally, especially when your show makes fun of things, make sure to careful about the choices you make, and think about them from all angles. Also, them being men in wigs is more distracting than it is funny- you don’t want different elements of your show to fight against each other for attention- as an audience member, I should know what to focus on.


(Rod Brown) #29

Okay. Thank you so much for your viewpoint. Much needed :blush:


(Rod Brown) #30

These are some good feedback! Keep em coming :blush:


(Bri Castellini) #31

Do you have any questions or things you wanted advice about that you could ask us specifically? That might help, now that many first impressions are out of the way.


(Rod Brown) #32

Okay. I do have a question: in what ways can we change the viewpoint of others into not thinking that we are making a mockery of women? Because, believe it or not, we was raised by women in our family and when we are in characters, we are thinking about our family members and how they would act, which is common to us. I can definitely see your view on the webseries being perceived as sexist, but if anything, our women audience knows and can related to what we are portraying on film. Even when we are promoting a new episode on our live feed, we as a whole can’t stretch it enough to our audience that these characters are just characters. It’s not like our everyday life that we wear these wigs and such. We just want to be great in our own unique way


(Pablo Andreu) #33

Hi Rod, in order to prevent a certain viewpoint, the choices you make have to be central to your storyline, even in a comedy; otherwise, you run the risk of people wondering why you made that choice.

For example, Emma Stone, a white actor, was cast as a mixed Asian character in Aloha, which left many wondering why they cast a white person for that role. There are rumors that Tom Hardy, another white actor, may play Jafar in a live-action version of Aladdin. There are also many examples of cis men playing trans women, which has drawn a lot of criticism. Why not cast trans actors? Most of these people, I’m sure, are not outwardly prejudiced, but their choices don’t seem to add anything substantive to the story, which naturally begs the question, “Why cast these white or cis male actors for non-white or trans roles?” It could be an underlying bias or tendency that drives those decisions.

I would ask myself, if you haven’t already, “How does casting men as women add to the story I’m telling?” Or, better yet, “Could I tell the same story with less distraction with women cast as women?”


(Rod Brown) #34

Nice viewpoint @Pablo! We as creators, defined ourselves as part of the :rainbow_flag: community, so yes it may seems a bit weird that we are men as women characters. Throughout the season, we have included women as a recurring guest, who knows and understand the concept of our webseries. Of courses, we make sure that they are comfortable of doing improv acting. We just want to make people laugh in our own unique way :blush: