Web Series Release Query

question

(Erica) #1

Hello All,

A rather subjective question at present, as we don’t have the funding yet, but I am crafting a web series release schedule, in case we are successful in obtaining the funds. Would love your thoughts and insights on.

For a 16-part documentary schedule, what do you think is stronger:

  • a 16-week release schedule with both a teaser and the episode being shared each week; or

  • a 32-week release schedule with each week alternating between a teaser and an episode being shared

Looking forward to your thoughts.

Erica


(Meg Carroway) #2

I think a 16 week schedule is fine, since that’s pretty long by web series standards (and even many TV shows now!). Unless you’re worried about giving yourself more runway to do something… but I’m not sure as an audience member I’d be compelled by a teaser every other week instead of an episode. I would probably just drop off watching because teasers are generally at the end of episodes or before a full season, not released as their own thing


(Jon Chuby) #3

I agree with Meg, I think the 16 week release will be best. I would be worried about loosing people’s interest if it goes to long.


(Steve O'Reilly) #4

Jon & Meg,

You both mention being worried about going on too long. Post-release of a web series, do you think there is a point at which one should stop? If so, why? My biggest concern would be to start cultivating an audience and then abandon that audience to pursue something else. Do you think a continued social campaign is important to sustain long term in an effort to maintain that relationship with your audience, even if you have plans to move on?


(Bri Castellini) #5

So if I’m understanding correctly, I think they mean “going on too long” in context of taking too long to get the content. If a show is over and there’s no new content they’re waiting for, you can do whatever you want. I still release bits of social media marketing and supplemental content for my web series that hasn’t filmed an episode in 2 years, because I love it, but I’ve also transitioned those viewers to new projects because I know I can’t make more of the first show. We’re doing web series, so inherently we have far more opportunities for finding viewers than traditional TV because it’s not confined to a single air time- people can discover it whenever. Your plan has more to do with what you feel like doing and how much marketing energy you want to put behind a show that’s not making new episodes. You don’t abandon your audience, you just move them to the next thing, or to a more broad “Steve” thing, so that when you do have a new thing they’re already ready. Start a newsletter that’s more broadly about your work as a whole or yourself as an artist, start a blog, etc.